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Part 17: 100 Most Influential Ranking


vcczar
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Part 17: 100 Most Influential Ranking  

18 members have voted

  1. 1. Which of the following are among the most 100 influential people of all time? (See post for descriptions)

    • Joan of Arc
    • Joe Biden
      0
    • Johann S Bach
    • Johann W von Goethe
    • Johannes Gutenberg
    • Johannes Kepler
    • John Adams
    • John Calvin
    • John D Rockefeller
    • John Dalton
    • None of the above have been among one of the 100 most influential people.

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  • Poll closed on 06/03/2022 at 05:15 PM

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Here's the next part of the 100 most influential rankings. 

Rules:

- Please keep discussion on topic. 

- No trolling. 

- No complaining, although constructive criticism is okay. 

- No personal attacks.

- No commenting without voting. 

Joan of Arc Long-lasting pop culture icon for having led or inspired several French victories against the English, possibly saving France permanently.
Joe Biden The current president of the US
Johann S Bach Often considered the greatest composer of all time for his mastery in counterpoint, modulation, and contrapuntal motion; Arguably the most inventive composer.
Johann W von Goethe Greatest literary figure in the German language; arguably the first true literary celebrity.
Johannes Gutenberg Invented the first practical printer, which sparked a printing revolution, increasing knowledger, literacy, education, and usher in a more modern age of information; Gutenberg Bible was the first mass produced Bible; His press was central in spreading vernacular languages and reducing the importance of Latin as a written language; The Protestant Reformation was greatly aided by Gutenberg's press.
Johannes Kepler Crucial figure in turning astronomy into a scientific and mathematical field, rather than a field specifically for astrology; his laws of planetary motion revealed that planets move in ellipses; laid the foundations for Newton's theory of gravity
John Adams Foremost advocate of the US declaring independence from Great Britain; made the proposal that Washington be made General-in-Chief of Rev War army; 1st US minister to UK; 1st US VP; 2nd US President
John Calvin Founder of Calvinism, which is the chief philosophy of numerous protestant churches, such as Presbyterians, Congregational, Reformed. As such, Calvin has gained many more adherents than Luther. Some scholar give Calvin credit for the rise of Capitalism, since he inspired the “Protestant work ethic” and allowed the charging of interest on loans, which was condemned by other Christians.
John D Rockefeller The first American billionaire and, if adjusted for inflation into 2020 dollars, would be the wealthiest in human history with nearly half a trillion dollars.
John Dalton developed modern atomic theory.
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Only voted Gutenberg this time

He legitimately helped the Renaissance to start and the consequences of printing is equivalent to the invention of internet. It probably contributed to religious wars and to the spread of innovations compared to past years where monks had to copy everything.

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11 minutes ago, vcczar said:

I find it hard not to include Calvin, who I find as a kind of destructive figure, whether he intended to be or not. 

I mean I'm voting on influence, not on "good influence".  From that PM the other day you can probably guess what I think of Calvin personally, but I did vote for him here.

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1 minute ago, OrangeP47 said:

I mean I'm voting on influence, not on "good influence".  From that PM the other day you can probably guess what I think of Calvin personally, but I did vote for him here.

Yeah.  Same. Influence. Not just good influence. 

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2 minutes ago, Patine said:

Oh, and vcczar, there is apparently evidence of credibility that Musa I, the Mansa of the Mali Empire, in the 14th Century, who controlled the whole Trans-Saharan trade routes before Portugal built the first caravels to go around the West Coast of Africa out of range of corsairs, was the richest man in the world, translated to modern wealth.

Yeah, I've read that too. His true wealth is harder to calculate as we have Rockefeller's supposed exact numbers. I do have Mansa Musa as a top 100 nominee. 

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6 hours ago, Patine said:

Just voted. And I'd fully agree with you and OrangeP47 on Calvin. He was very significant, but more as a great theological blight, stain, and corruption on Christiandom. He basically repackaged and rebranded the Gnostic/Manichaean syncretic heresies of earlier, like the Bogomils, Bosnian Church, Cathars, and Paulicians, altered to the point of unrecognizability, but maintaining several core themes (Manichaean Duality becomes Predeterminism and a much starker and harsher view of sin and virtue, and the Gnostic Elect who transcend the Demiurge's False World to be one with the the True God through the Pistis Sofia become the Elect who will attain Salvation). But his influence can't be denied. Oh, and vcczar, there is apparently evidence of credibility that Musa I, the Mansa of the Mali Empire, in the 14th Century, who controlled the whole Trans-Saharan trade routes before Portugal built the first caravels to go around the West Coast of Africa out of range of corsairs, was the richest man in the world, translated to modern wealth. He was literally swimming in gold, and apparently crashed the economy of the Mameluke Sultanate, in what is now Egypt, when he and his entourage threw around money while taking accomadations there on their way to the Haj. The reputation of Musa, in fact, is why the Royal Geographic Society put a large money prize on any explorer who found Timbuktu, Musa's capital, even though when Rene Callie claimed the prize in 1828 (despite Major Gordon Laing having been there two years earlier), it was, by that point, a dusty, run-down, low-population, camel watering hole.

Actually, he was an admirer of Augustine, and from what I understand, Augustine used to be a Manichaean. He left the group and denounced it, but some of it's influence may have remained. I've seen the claim that Augustine has some dualistic attitudes.

I'm not a fan of his theological views on Predestination (me being on the Arminian side.).

I also do not have a favorable view on his burning of Servetus. I think I would agree with the likes of Sebastian Castellio and John Foxe who were very averse to persecution whether done by Catholics or Protestants.

Edited by Timur
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