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2018 US Senate Election Republican Primaries


Timur
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Republican Primaries  

5 members have voted

  1. 1. Arizona

  2. 2. Connecticut

    • Matthew Corey
    • Dominic Rapini
      0
  3. 3. Delaware

    • Rob Arlett
    • Gene Truono
    • Rocky De La Fuente
  4. 4. Florida

    • Rick Scott
    • Rocky De La Fuente
  5. 5. Hawaii

    • Ron Curtis
      0
    • Consuelo Anderson
    • Robert C. Helsham Sr.
      0
    • Thomas E. White
      0
    • Rocky De La Fuente
    • George L. Berish
    • Michael R. Hodgkiss
      0
    • Eddie Pirkowski
      0
  6. 6. Indiana

    • Mike Braun
    • Todd Rokita
      0
    • Luke Messer
  7. 7. Maryland

    • Tony Campbell
    • Chris Chaffee
      0
    • Christina J. Grigorian
      0
    • John Graziani
    • Blaine Taylor
      0
    • Gerald I. Smith Jr.
      0
    • Brian Charles Vaeth
      0
    • Evan M. Cronhardt
      0
    • Bill Krehnbrink
      0
    • Nnabu Eze
      0
    • Albert Binyahmin Howard
      0
  8. 8. Massachusetts

    • Geoff Diehl
    • John Kingston III
    • Beth Joyce Lindstrom
  9. 9. Michigan

    • John James
    • Sandy Pensler
  10. 10. Minnesota

    • Jim Newberger
    • Merrill Anderson
      0
    • Ray Hart Anderon
      0
    • Rocky De La Fuente
  11. 11. Minnesota Special

    • Karin Housley
    • Bob Anderson
    • Nikolay Nikolayevich Bay
      0
  12. 12. Mississippi

    • Roger Wicker
    • Richard Boyanton
  13. 13. Missouri

    • Josh Hawley
    • Tony Monetti
    • Austin Petersen
    • Kristi Nichols
      0
    • Christina Smith
      0
    • Ken Patterson
      0
    • Peter Pfeifer
      0
    • Courtland Sykes
      0
    • Fred Ryman
      0
    • Brian G. Hagg
      0
    • Bradley Krembs
      0
  14. 14. Montana

    • Matt Rosendale
    • Russell Fagg
    • Trey Downing
      0
    • Albert Olszewski
      0
  15. 15. Nebraska

    • Deb Fischer
    • Todd F. Watson
    • Jack Heidel
      0
    • Jeffrey Lynn Stein
      0
    • Dennis Frank Macek
      0
  16. 16. Nevada

    • Dean Heller
    • Tom Heck
      0
    • Sherry Brooks
      0
    • Sarah Garzala
      0
    • Vic Harrell
      0
    • None of These Candidates
  17. 17. New Jersey

    • Bob Hugin
    • Brian D. Goldberg
  18. 18. North Dakota

    • Kevin Cramer
    • Thomas O'Neill
  19. 19. Ohio

    • JIm Renacci
    • Mike Gibbons
    • Melissa Ackison
    • Dan Kiley
      0
    • Don Elijah Eckhart
  20. 20. Pennsylvania

    • Lou Barletta
    • Jim Christiana
  21. 21. Rhode Island

    • Robert Flaunders
    • Rocky De La Fuente
  22. 22. Tennessee

    • Marsha Blackburn
    • Aaron Pettigrew
  23. 23. Texas

    • Ted Cruz
    • Mary Miller
      0
    • Bruce Jacobson Jr.
      0
    • Stefano D. Stefano
    • Geraldine Sam
  24. 24. Utah

    • Mitt Romney
    • Mike Kennedy
  25. 25. Vermont

    • H. Brooke Paige
    • Lawrence Zupan
    • Jadseep Vannu
      0
    • Bernie Sanders
    • Rocky De La Fuente
  26. 26. Virginia

    • Corey Stewart
    • Nick Freitas
    • E. W. Jackson
  27. 27. West Virginia

    • Patrick Morrisey
    • Evan Jenkins
    • Don Blankenship
    • Tom Willis
      0
    • Bo Copley
      0
    • Jack Newbrough
      0
  28. 28. Wisconsin

    • Leah Vukmir
    • Kevin Nicholson
    • George Lucia
      0
    • Griffin Jones
      0
    • Charles Barman
  29. 29. Wyoming

    • John Barrasso
    • Dave Dodson
      0
    • John Holtz
      0
    • Charlie Hardy
      0
    • Rocky De La Fuente
    • Anthony Van Rissegham
      0

This poll is closed to new votes

  • Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.
  • Poll closed on 06/01/2021 at 07:29 AM

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Missouri is the campaign that I was most involved with (even after a number of more campaigns now). I made 14k phone calls for Austin Petersen and knew everyone on staff (a lot of Freitas people came over after that race in Virginia). Even though it was my lowest paying campaign job (and we got killed), that was one of the funnest ones I have been apart of.

Edited by jvikings1
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35 minutes ago, jvikings1 said:

Missouri is the campaign that I was most involved with (even after a number of more campaigns now). I made 14k phone calls for Austin Petersen and knew everyone on staff (a lot of Freitas people came over after that race in Virginia). Even though it was my lowest paying campaign job (and we got killed), that was one of the funnest ones I have been apart of.

I was honestly shocked by how poorly he performed.

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5 minutes ago, Dobs said:

I was honestly shocked by how poorly he performed.

There was a lot going on behind the scenes that explains the result. First off, they put the citizens vote on right to work during the primary (rather than the general). This drove a lot of people to the polls who would not typically have shown up for the primary (big boost to Hawley). The state party changes their rules allowing them to spend money in favor of Hawley as well. Mitch McConnell poured tons of money into the race to prop up Hawley's candidacy, and all the major conservative groups (Freedomworks, Senate Conservatives Fund, Tea Party Patriots, etc.) endorsed him as well (something I still do not understand to this day). And the big trump card was the Trump endorsement.

When combined with the monetary constraints we faced, it was no surprise to see the result.

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1 minute ago, Patine said:

 

Well, a someone who jumped ship to become "electable," in the rigged U.S. electoral system from a party based around Government abdicating most of it's basic duties and responsibilities, and privatizing them to predatory, vulture corporate interests, who are then also given more power to exploit the citizen for their own profits, and denying the basic protections and dignities of humanity to those who aren't filthy rich, won't work like dogs with no complaint, or don't effectively pay, "protection money," to big corporate interests, because Government becomes too anemic to protect the vaunted natural rights Libertarianism is, in theory, based on, from these rising corporate dictators, like out of the dystopian movies and other media from the '80's about corporatist dictatorships, might not go over well with Social Conservatives, Neocons, Trumpists, or disgruntled Democrats...

There was a lot more than just being electable. Austin received massive amounts of abuse in the LP (especially for his pro-life position). Not to mention the disaster that that party is (just as internally corrupt and disorganized as the major parties).

Though it must also be pointed out that many more people heard and embraced his message as a Republican, which helped him get a full time gig as a radio host.

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9 minutes ago, Patine said:

 

Well, a someone who jumped ship to become "electable," in the rigged U.S. electoral system from a party based around Government abdicating most of it's basic duties and responsibilities, and privatizing them to predatory, vulture corporate interests, who are then also given more power to exploit the citizen for their own profits, and denying the basic protections and dignities of humanity to those who aren't filthy rich, won't work like dogs with no complaint, or don't effectively pay, "protection money," to big corporate interests, because Government becomes too anemic to protect the vaunted natural rights Libertarianism is, in theory, based on, from these rising corporate dictators, like out of the dystopian movies and other media from the '80's about corporatist dictatorships, might not go over well with Social Conservatives, Neocons, Trumpists, or disgruntled Democrats...

Is this a sentence? I’m not actually able to find a verb that functions as a predicate that connects to your subject “someone who jumped ship...”.

It seems like one very long clause, not even a run-on sentence because it doesn’t satisfy the requirements for a sentence.

It would take a true scholar of the English language to diagram this, and I’d honestly pay a few bucks to see it.

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Just now, Patine said:

I thought abortion was what was called a, "don't touch," issue in the Libertarian Party, (that is, the party itself would never state an official position, or demand members do so, because both sides of the issue could be supported by different viewpoints of Libertarian ideology).

I thought so too, but many Libertarians are pro-choice.

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53 minutes ago, Patine said:

I thought abortion was what was called a, "don't touch," issue in the Libertarian Party, (that is, the party itself would never state an official position, or demand members do so, because both sides of the issue could be supported by different viewpoints of Libertarian ideology).

No, the LP's official position is that the government should not be able to make any restrictions on abortion (though the state should not fund them). It is one of the key issues which prevents the party from being able to grow because those who disagree with the platform see it as non-negotiable. And, pro-lifers are also bullied (like Austin was when he was a member).

Libertarians: Abortion is a matter for individual conscience, not public decree | Libertarian Party (lp.org)

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