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Poll: Your stance on Crime


vcczar

Poll: Your stance on Crime  

15 members have voted

  1. 1. What do you think are the 5 leading causes of high crime? [Pick only 5]

    • Population density
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    • Homeless people
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    • High rates of mental illness
    • High rates of drug addiction
    • Marijuana
      0
    • Poverty
    • Job availability
    • Educational inequality
    • Income inequality
    • Social inequality
    • Religion
      0
    • Lack of religion
      0
    • Economic recessions
      0
    • High taxes
      0
    • Race or ethnicity
    • High divorce rates
      0
    • Absent parents
    • Climate
    • Lack of enough police funding
    • Punishments for crimes are too lenient
    • Social media
      0
    • Citizens don't do enough to report on crimes to help combat them
      0
    • Racism
    • Boredom
    • Immigrants
    • Gun culture/guns
    • Other (mention below)
  2. 2. Should the federal government spend money to combat the 5 leading causes you selected above in order to reduce crime.

    • No.
    • Only if the state and local goverment lacks the money to do so.
    • Yes.
  3. 3. What should be the punishment for willful murder in most cases?

    • Death Penalty
    • Life in prison w/o parole
    • Life in prison w/ possible parole
    • A long non-life sentence w/ possible parole
    • A short sentence
      0
    • A warning
      0
    • Deportation/exile
      0
    • Forced conscription into the military or as a human lab rat for experiments
      0
    • Other (mention below)
  4. 4. If you believe in the death penalty for willful murder, do these specific willful murders warrant the death penalty?

    • Murdering a spouse/domestic partner (or the lover) that is caught cheating
    • Murdering a physically/sexually abusive partner/relative
    • Murdering someone who has raped their spouse/partner/relative
    • Murdering a murderer who is on the loose, rather than calling the authorities
      0
    • Murdering someone who claims that they're going to kill a person or people
      0
    • Murdering someone that looks like they're about to commit a violent crime against someone else
      0
    • Murdering innocent civilians of an enemy nation during warfare.
    • other type of murder (mention below)
    • I don't believe in the death penalty
  5. 5. Does the death penalty violate the commandment "Thou Shalt Not Kill?"

    • Yes, and it is a good reason to abolish the death penalty.
    • Yes, but we should ignore God's commandment
    • No
    • Who cares
  6. 6. Should any of the following carry a death sentence?

    • Being Woke
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    • Being MAGA
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    • Robbery
    • Aggravated Assault
    • Selling hard drugs
    • Using hard drugs
      0
    • Selling marijuana
      0
    • Using marijuana
      0
    • Abortion
      0
    • Rape
    • Burglary
    • Larceny
      0
    • Motor theft
      0
    • Arson
    • False advertisement
      0
    • Sex offender
    • Other (mention below)
    • I don't believe in the death penalty
  7. 7. If you were elected mayor of a town with the highest crime-rate in the nation, which of the following would be the most appropriate way to respond to crime?

    • Do nothing and hope that it resolves itself.
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    • Secretly work with crime bosses to see if the crime rate can be decreased from within. A corrupt bargain.
    • Massive funding to police, orders for them to be more aggressive, more patrols in high crime neighborhoods, orders to kill crime bosses and known criminals. Drones. Full on war.
    • Accessible and affordable drug clinics, mental health/therapy clinics, gun laws, more security camera, job training, neighborhood beautification in poor neighborhoods, etc.
    • Other (mention below)
  8. 8. Should white colllar crimes be punished as severely as blue collar crimes? If so, which ones should carry at least a long-term sentence (say 20+ years or more)

    • Major public corruption
    • Major healthcare fraud
    • Major mortgage fraud
    • Major securities fraud
    • Major money laundering
    • Other (mention below)
    • White collar crimes should not be punished severely
  9. 9. If you owned a business, would you hire a freed ex-con who had commited a violent crime if they were talented and seemed otherwise normal and reconstructed?

  10. 10. If someone murdered someone you loved, you would....

    • Murder them myself
    • Fight for the death penalty once they were on trial
    • Continue my opposition to the death penalty once they were on trial, but never forgive them,even if they seem genuinely remorseful.
    • Continue my opposition to the death penalty once they were on trial, and I'd likely eventually forgive them, if they seem genuinely remorseful.
    • I don't know.


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New poll. This one was difficult because I am not as interested in crime as a policy/issue as I am in other areas.

The idea of cities being high crime seems kind of alien to me, despite me being an urban person born in a city. I have never been around high crime at all and I have not seen it -- in Dallas, Austin, San Marcos, Plano, Greenville, New Orleans, DC, Boston/Cambridge, Philadelphia, NYC. I even walked through the Queensbridge Projects in Queens at 3am by myself and felt safe. 

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For #8 white collar crimes. I'd also equally punish con-artists, willfilly misleading advertisements (also a type of con), politicians who are willfilly misleading (as opposed to accidental or via ignorance). price-gouging, especially during a crisis. I can probably think of others. I'm actually more likely to be severe on white collar crimes because those involved typically aren't doing it out of desperation to feed their family or themself. It's typically an educated person taking advantage of someone out of pure greed. It's not to say that many blue collar crimes aren't also conducted by educated people/greed, etc. Sorry typing this fast. I'd polish it up and be more specific if time allowed.

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To clarify on 8, I'm not against white collar criminals getting 20+ years, I just think a 20 year minimum would be foolish. White collar crime is very case-by-case, imo.

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A more accurate translation of the quoted commandment is “Do not murder” according to my research which directly relates to blood guilt and unlawful/immoral killing and not a blanket ban on all forms of man killing man.

6. My other is Child Abuse of any variety.

10. I’m not a very forgiving person, and I just don’t believe in it when it comes to things like murder. 

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8 hours ago, vcczar said:

New poll. This one was difficult because I am not as interested in crime as a policy/issue as I am in other areas.

The idea of cities being high crime seems kind of alien to me, despite me being an urban person born in a city. I have never been around high crime at all and I have not seen it -- in Dallas, Austin, San Marcos, Plano, Greenville, New Orleans, DC, Boston/Cambridge, Philadelphia, NYC. I even walked through the Queensbridge Projects in Queens at 3am by myself and felt safe. 

Go to Philadelphia after an Eagles game. Doesn't matter if they win or lose. Take cover.

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2 hours ago, DakotaHale said:

Go to Philadelphia after an Eagles game. Doesn't matter if they win or lose. Take cover.

Better yet. Try to be an opposing fan walking out of an Eagles game.

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For number 7: A combination of 3 and 4 depending on the situation. 

And finally concerning 10, I'll advocate the death penalty if I haven't delivered it myself already... (The question really depends on the circumstance, am I with the loved one when they were murdered? If so, self-defense kicks in and they'll be dead.)

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5 hours ago, WVProgressive said:

A more accurate translation of the quoted commandment is “Do not murder” according to my research which directly relates to blood guilt and unlawful/immoral killing and not a blanket ban on all forms of man killing man.

 

This is correct and corroborated by many scholars, translators, and theologians. I'm still fine with "Thou shall not kill." being said as long as you understand, if one is a Christian, there are plenty of circumstances and verses in the Bible that support the notion of self-defense, defending others, defending your family, etc.  

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I have hard feelings about Death Penalty, while on one side its a bad policy that can lead to innocent lives being killed, but on the other had; I would absolutely support a policy that gets rid of fucking pedos and mass rapists from this world. Its hard and I believe that new standard of proof needs to be established for it, Absolute Certainty, where there is so much evidence that if you believe that other person is innocent, then you must be out of your goddamn mind.

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I don't believe the state should have the power to end the life of one of it's own citizens.  Even with a perfect justice system, there's too much potential for deliberate abuse, it's best not to open the can of worms at all.

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6 hours ago, OrangeP47 said:

I don't believe the state should have the power to end the life of one of it's own citizens.  Even with a perfect justice system, there's too much potential for deliberate abuse, it's best not to open the can of worms at all.

True, to add on to what I said about Absolute Certainty, its hard to accept this as just a jury decision, There has to be a different way where the tyranny of majority and minority doesn't contribute anything.

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43 minutes ago, vcczar said:

Ok, we've now done welfare, crime, and healthcare. What non-foreign policy, non-diplomacy, non-military issue should I do next?

education, energy, immigration, the administrative state?

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  1. I picked three: high rates of mental illness, high rates of drug addiction, and poverty. The "other" two I would pick would be: homelessness (not the same as "homeless people") and, for lack of a better term, evil. By "evil", I just mean that some people are going to commit crimes and do awful things regardless, and in those instances it doesn't make sense to attribute their crimes to addiction, poverty, or something else. Murdering your spouse to cash out on their life insurance policy is an example of something that falls into that category.
  2. Yes
  3. There should be no minimum sentences or even sentencing guidelines. Criminal justice reform should be focused on rehabilitation, not punishment. I would advocate for a system of rehabilitation which would isolate potentially dangerous offenders from general society while they are being rehabilitated. In instances where people are too dangerous for general society and rehabilitation efforts have consistently failed, focus should be shifted to trying to bring these offenders as normal a life as possible, while not risking danger to society. I imagine this would consist of the offender spending their life in prison, but in better conditions than current U.S. prisons (e.g. no solitary confinement, prevention of assaults inside prisons, penal labor reform, etc.).
  4. I categorically oppose the death penalty.
  5. Yes, but that shouldn't matter. While I don't understand how a Christian could ever support the death penalty, we have separation of church and state for a reason, so the Commandments should not have an effect on our laws.
  6. See #4.
  7. I would do the fourth option, plus increase efforts to bring about affordable housing. 
  8. See #3. In addition, for white-collar crimes, it would make sense to prevent offenders from even having the ability to repeat their offenses. (For example, someone like Bernie Madoff would never be able to work in white-collar professions again. He would be limited to working primarily physical labor jobs.)
  9. Yes.
  10. I understand it's easier said than done, but I'd like to believe I'd forgive them, regardless of whether they show remorse or not. As a Catholic, I would need to forgive them.
Edited by jnewt
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On 4/3/2024 at 10:09 PM, vcczar said:

Ok, we've now done welfare, crime, and healthcare. What non-foreign policy, non-diplomacy, non-military issue should I do next?

Housing (even though I'm probably the only person interested enough here haha)

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